Out of Pod Experience

 
 

Hunting Habitable Exo-Planets

Author
#1 - 2017-04-28 16:44:03 UTC
When looking for habitable planets a telescope would first look for transits across the sun to determine if a planet was present.

When viewing a sun I would look for light wavelengths emanated by the exo-sun that produces light wavelengths near the same as our Sun that is then absorbed by the following flowers:

Bees Love

1. Dandelion
2. Fennel
3. Lavender
4. Nasturtium
5. Ox-eye Daisy .
6. Rosemary
7. Snapdragon
8. Sunflower
9. Teasel
10. Yarrow

The reason being is that if an exo-sun produces the same type of light in near similar wavelengths that are then absorbed by the flowers SIMILAR to the above that bees love and pollinate then if a planet is located within the habitable zone of the Yellow Dwarf then chances are it would have an environment consistent with the environment of Earth.

Honey bees would be able to pollinate flowers found on the exo-planet that are similar to flowers on Earth as well as the exo-planet fitting into a guideline of natural pollination from honey bees that might similar to Earth Honey Bees.

Other insects and the light wavelengths they see in that pollinate flowers would be:

1. Ants
2. Hoverflies
3. Lepidopterans
4. Butterflies
5. Moths.
6. Flower Beetles

The remaining caste of insect pollinators would fill out the remaining 20% of a planets pollination factory and might see colors that the honey bees are unable to see.

Being able to detect if a sun is producing light wavelengths to produce modern flowering plants that honey bees would pollinate would produce a solar system that is more modern to the Sol System compared to a sun that produces light wavelengths that would suggest the system is much younger and that flowering plants might not be present but rather instead fungi and spore type plants that would suggest a less environmentally evolved planet than Earth could be present.
ChaosTheory.
#2 - 2017-04-29 00:11:57 UTC
DrysonBennington wrote:


Bees Love

1. Dandelion
2. Fennel
3. Lavender
4. Nasturtium
5. Ox-eye Daisy .
6. Rosemary
7. Snapdragon
8. Sunflower
9. Teasel
10. Yarrow

The reason being is that if an exo-sun produces the same type of light in near similar wavelengths ...


Sounds reasonable if you approach the idea from an adjacent anthill. While there is a correlation between spectral classification and habitable zone distances, you cannot extrapolate biome composition from congruent insolation. We may have the luxury of Sol-compatible plants but on another world, that same sunlight could be searing apart subsurface methane into an atmoshpere that over eons becomes inarguably bee-killing. Rather than flowers and pollenating insects, we would need to transplant anything environmentally recognizable using suits like Starlord or Spock in the active caldera of recent media.
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