Should we really want botters to be banned?

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Because it is cheating.

Nobody likes cheaters.

Burn them all…

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They inflate the price of plex.

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Why do you think someone would run dozens of bots on a video game for? It’s not because they like the game. They’re selling their farmed items for IRL cash which is something that can lead to a lot of liability issues for the developer, not to mention it goes against the spirit of the game because it’s cheating.

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Calm down.

Botter.

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You really have a unique and special view of this don’t you?

“Bots provide content and free kills” - Whoever is legitimately only after free, effortless kills I could care less of their opinions. If that’s what someone is after after they can go shoot rats, it’s basically the same thing. So no, not even close to a valid reason to keep bots around.

Inflated numbers are known to actually hurt a game. When someone logs into a game that says they have tens of thousands of people online they have the expectation that they will have others to interact with, then don’t run into anyone the game feels empty and they are let down. Then when they do run into someone and they realize it’s a bot that looks really bad on the company and leads to bad PR. When they go after a resource only to see it hovered up by an army of bots they simply leave. I’m not just referring to EVE here, but the many other MMOs that have far worse botting problems who’s starting zones and cities are ghost towns yet have thousands of “people” playing them.

Bots cause inflation in the plex market as bots that are not abusing the alpha system are a drain on the plex market itself. The plex market has always acted to absorbed EVE’s inflation, which is why the price is not nearly as stable as other goods. Bots cause certain markets to become depressed, such as minerals and ore in the case of EVE. While it may seem nice to those who take advantage of the lower prices, it is harmful the the ecosystem have no doubt about it.

Put simply, every player who cares about the game they are playing should care about the presence of bots. RMT aside, players using them are gaining a definite advantage over those who are playing by the rules. The most common practice you’ll see from a casual botter is to have it run while they are at work or asleep. A normal player will obviously not be active when they are doing either. Even if the bot was just set to cycle on veldspar the entire time, it’s effects would be felt over time creating the advantage. Meanwhile the average player will find the value of their minerals decrease or find the market flooded and be forced to move to another market or activity. These effects obviously occur much faster the more bots that are present. A single bot may have little to no effect, but it’s never just one, and it’s never just present in a single market or location.

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Not sure if OP trolling or serious.

It depends on the type of bots. If the bots are actual-player run, then they are basically pumping out resources and ISK to feed certain groups or alliances. That means titan bloat, supercap bloat, and people who can toss around trillions of ISK to manipulate markets. It also means that at a certain level of the game, unless you bot, you are at a competitive disadvantage.

If the bots are RMT farmers, then everything they farm and sell for RL cash is effectively less money that goes towards CCP.

If the bots are supporting SP farms as well, then the repackaged SP getting cheaper and more available on the market also distorts the game profile, as more people take the ISK from their own bot/farm ops and inject into Rorqs, carriers, whatever.

Bots are not ‘the main problem’ with EVE, although they are a symptom of some of the more noticeable problems. They are, however, an overall negative influence on the game in a lot of ways.

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It’s quite simple really. The majority of players don’t have hundreds of billions of isk invested into plex, and botters cause plex prices to rise. Botting harms everyone EXCEPT the botters and the people who invested in plex/people who buy plex. Basically since the majority of players don’t buy plex/have tons of plex stashed, they complain in great numbers to try to keep plex prices lower so they can keep affording it.

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This is a new low for the forums…

  • Bots ■■■■-up the market and make the efforts of non-botters worth less.

  • They capture sites in faction warfare massively influencing warzone control and cause people to be kicked out of their homes.

  • They monitor local and gather intel to people who shouldn’t have it.

  • They take away the rocks of people who want to mine legitimately.

  • They constantly update market orders to out-compete non-botters.

  • They take massive amounts of dev time and resources to manage.

Perhaps biomass yourself if you think bots are a good thing.

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Ban them.

Next.

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Botters shouldn’t even get the temp ban option just nuked altogether if found doing it. Least CCP seems to be hitting those corps and alliances that harbour them as well. Also more teleporting those confirmed into systems would be good.

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Believe it or not, Bots are probably the leading cause of inflation. They are also responsible for rmting.

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Probably 100% true…

Personally I feel…
That if CCP can detect and confirm the person behind the botting…all their bots should just be made perma-suspect…and any future account they create is perma-suspect…fro every account they own.

Then we can just shoot them at will.
I mean seeing as ban waves are not really cutting it.

A game’s economy is usually balanced around (among other things) a rate of game-currency creation per player that’s doesn’t vary too much (modest growth is ok).

Similarly, on aggregate the amount of game-currency per time-unit per player should be approximately constant. “On aggregate” because gamers usually expect that “low-end” players should earn less per hour, and high-end players more per hour. The high-end vs low-end spread is poorly managed in EVE, but averaged across all players there should be a balance between time and income.

Bots mess up the balance, because they generate significant amounts of game-currency without requiring player-time to be spent.

The “price” is that the first objective (managing the amount of currency per player) is skewed in favor of botters at the expense of other real players. Specifically, ceteris paribus, real players have to grind more to get the same buying power.

And (as in the real world) it affects real players with the lowest ISK-income more in absolute terms (i.e. grinding time) than the richest ones.

CCP has become “addicted” to the effects of some bad decisions that provide short-term gains at the expense of long-term results. Botting is one.

Games with “too much” botting are harder for new players than games with little or no botting: rational prospective players will check this, and choose where to spend their time accordingly.

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I want to hit the little heart button a thousand times

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Only if you know they are bot, and take advantage of their programming to trap them (through log off bubble traps for example.)

In general it is much harder to catch a botted VNI which is programmed to warp to safety the moment someone shows up in local than it is to catch a ratting player, who might not be paying attention or has a slightly worse response time.

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Are you utterly deranged?

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How are we supposed to kill botters,
when they dock up the second someone enters local?

It only really works when the software fucks up,
or when local is broken.

Let me give you an example.

Let’s say you have a hobby. Let’s say you enjoy your hobby and the achievements you’re … uhm … achieving. Self made achievements, sure, but whatever. Like, for example, you’ve finished building a ship in a bottle, all by yourself, and you’re going to a competition to show it off and maybe even win a price.

In comes the botter.
He did not build the ship-in-a-bottle himself, instead he used AI and a robot to do it for him. He has a dozen literal masterpieces, all done by software and a robot. He participates in the competition and, while it’s apparent he’s a botter, it’s not disallowed by the rules.

Now tell me how many actual people will be caring about doing this,
when they know that assholes who don’t even put any work into it,
can outcompete them by cheating using AI and a robot.

In case you need an answer:

In the long run people will just stop doing it. Humans can’t outcompete AI and robots in the long run. The end result is that only the botters will be left and any competition would devolve into comparison of algorithms and robots, instead of art and skill by the guy who actually built them.

Same goes for formula 1. Imagine a team started using a robot. From that point on every team would be required to use a robot, because a robot will always outperform a human. At that point it’s not about skill anymore, but about algorithms. It’s not about sports anymore, but about who writes the better AI.

Assuming you’re not actually a botter, all you really need to do to understand why people hate botters is looking at your favourite activity and how it could be devalued by people who use bots instead of skill and effort.

Do you understand now?

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