Project discovery, Am I doing it wrong?


(Nibbs Skor) #1

So I keep finding patterns like this one, where the waveform to me appears to be an eclipsing binary, and I’m marking any drops in light level that distort the waveform coming from the star, but Eve says no. Is it simply the case of too many people not understanding what they’re looking at marking up the star’s characteristics? Or am I totally in the wrong here?


(Nibbs Skor) #2

Another example, surely that’s a pulsar, not an exoplanet orbiting the star every half a day?


(Tychicus Banner) #3

I suggest marking them as a transit just in-case. Mark a planet should be your first move, reporting a certain star is something you will do when you get into 80-90%.


(Sindara T'Soni) #4

From my perspective, you are in the wrong. Then again, I have only learned to give Project Discovery what I know it wants. Does that mean we are all wrong? Possibly. You could be correct but as Project Discovery works on consensus that’s not going to do you any good.

I would mark that down as an exoplanet orbiting the star every half day, indeed, and actual right or wrong aside, that is what Project Discovery wants.

Interesting to think that we could all be doing it wrong, haha.


(Nibbs Skor) #5

if you think about a small object orbiting a far larger one if it were touching the surface of the star it would only mask the light when the planet is in front of it not behind it so for at least half the orbit pattern the star must be at full brightness. (i.e. half the pattern should be flattish at the top) which isn’t the case in the one I reckon is a pulsar, as that continues in the same wave form. If that makes sense?


(Nibbs Skor) #6

I get why you’re saying that, I’m torn between going for a high accuracy rating in Eve to get the rewards faster, or to go for what I believe is scientifically accurate, meeting the intended purpose of the project


(Tychicus Banner) #7

Once you get to 80% and above, the amount of test samples massively decease, so you can focus on doing them right.

I feel the same.


(Nevyn Auscent) #8

If it were a pulsar it would have a more wave form. The sudden v is indicative of an orbiting body while a smooth wave is not.
Those samples are marked by the pd staff also. Not by any form of consensus.


(Felyx Ravencroft) #9

Unless the test sample is a manufactured one for practice purposes (entirely possible), it couldn’t be a pulsar, because their periods range from milliseconds up to seconds, not hours (unless there’s some type of rotating neutron star with a slower period that I’m unaware of - if so, it’s probably not classified as a pulsar in any case, though.)

[EDIT} The longest-period pulsar has a period of under 9 seconds (thanks, Wikipedia :smiley: )


(Nibbs Skor) #10

You are quite correct, I meant to type “Pulsating Star” as in the sample patters in the discovery tool, not “Pulsar”. Stupid brain making mistakes when frustrated.


(Felyx Ravencroft) #11

LOL! Mine does that too, sometimes (read: “with alarming frequency rivalling that of a pulsar”)


(Rexxar Santaro) #12

2 Epoch aren’t counted by this UI anymore. I didn’t noticed any in the last like 1000 samples. This UI and algorithm can’t compute 3 or more Epochs!

Your second sample has a graph, similar to a Pulsar star, but the bottom shapes are more ‘sharper’ than upper shapes. They are counted like ‘shadow sinks’ by a small celestial object (not a planet for sure). Pure Pulsar diagrams have more symmetric shapes without ‘sharp’ oscillations mostly.


(Aergri Evingod) #13

I am also wondering about the curves mentioned by OP, haven’t encountered them anymore after lvl 20 I think.


(Aruar) #14

Keep it up! after a while you’ll learn to pick out the transits from the noise. It took me a while too.


(Cypherous) #15

You don’t gain anything from doing them right though, once you get away from the test samples its literally just clicking “No transit” for free progress :stuck_out_tongue:


(Xandar Dice) #16

Yeah, I get this feeling too. There is no way that the orbit of two planets can be the same distance from the star, but just in different parts of the orbit they ‘share’.


(Aruar) #17

Yeah I don’t think that’s possible either.


(Syke Sylveste) #18

If alien life exists, it will be extremely resource hungry machines. Any organic life will always eventually be replaced by machines and AI it creates.

It’s possible some of these strange orbits are gigantic artificial bodies.


(system) #19

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