Is there any CSM advocating for EVE on Linux?

Dear CSMs,

is anybody of you running EVE on Linux or at least having an opinion on the EVE/Linux topic?

Thank you and best regards,
Meditril

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@Mike_Azariah @Suitonia @Brisc_Rubal

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I would emphasise not just running on Linux, but running natively.

Is there enough market share to be worth CCP’s money to develop it? If not, CSM isn’t going to make any headway even if they did advocate for it. If it costs CCP more money to create and support the native client than what they earn from users of the client, it’s a losing proposition for them to develop it. Look at how long it has taken for MacOS to get native client development started - and it isn’t anywhere near done yet.

Innominate runs EVE on Linux, and I brought the issue up in the last meeting.

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The other issue on top of there possibly not being enough Linux users to justify a native version is that Eve does work fine in wine (barring the issues they introduce with the launcher).

This means they can earn $ from Linux customers with little or no development effort or cost to maintain them beyond the Windows version.

Why then would they ever be motivated to pay more to get the income they already can get basically for free?

While I am a Linux user and would love a native EVE. I just don’t see the benefit as a business for CCP to undertake that endeavor. Given the situation I would just be happy if they didn’t do things like randomly breaking the launcher. But if you read the latest thread the in Linux forum (and the dev’s posts there) you will see CCP definitely has no plans for Linux. In fact they are actively moving to programming that they know breaks working on Linux and it doesn’t seem to be a problem for them at all if they lost Linux customers.

I suspect they are aiming for Linux customers to use EVE Anywhere, given the hints that EVE Anywhere will be a paid service - as if that would make people happier!

Unfortunately EVE anywhere doesn’t work anywhere… especially not in Europe :frowning:
At the end there is no need for a full support, in my opinion it would be enough if CCP would give the WINE development team enough hints so that they can enhance WINE as easy as possible and keep backwards compatibility until WINE added necessary features.

EVE Anywhere is still in beta; the current availability is unlikely their entire intended market. I’m not suggesting it is a replacement today, only that it would not surprise me if CCP’s overall deployment plan for EVE Anywhere includes ‘cares for players using OSes we do not support’ and thus removes incentive for direct Linux support.

It should be noted that the CCP-supported WINE launcher is being deprecated when the MacOS native client is launched. I have to hope they have some plan for the customers who use the WINE client as it is - including users of older versions of MacOS that are not supported by the new client.

Also Eve anywhere uses substantially more bandwidth than EVE does. Many people that can play EVE just fine would find Eve anywhere to be garbage as their connection wouldn’t handle it.

Again: not saying it’s a good solution for the customer base, only that I would not be surprised if that is the direction they go.

While I am pretty sure that Eve anywhere uses significantly more bandwidth I think it will be the long term way to go for most games anyway. As casual customers today are less and less willing to invest into expensive up-to-date hardware and streaming is a good solution to this challenge. Look for example at video streaming, you can today watch you videos on almost every device connected with the internet (even Linux), just using a plain browser. This will reduce even on Windows so much of the support need that I am pretty sure most companies will head for this in the long run. And at least for the past, bandwidth was increased so so much over time, so what’s high today was ridiculous in the past and might be standard tomorrow.

Video streaming is not even close to streaming a game.

Video streaming is one way from the server to the client and with buffering, lag or delay isn’t a problem. If your stream loads a second slower but doesn’t lag you don’t care. No feedback from the client is needed during viewing as the stream is rendered the same no matter what.

With games the stream must render based on feedback from the client. Delay between input and video rendering makes the game unplayable. This is why while I tried certain streaming game services i will never use them even if they were free. The gameplay is flat out sub par. Streaming games are just not as responsive as you would expect after playing games on hardware. They never will be either as the back and forth over the internet will always be slower than local processing of input to graphics rendering.

Good point… time will tell, at least for EVE I would expect that my current 20ms ping time would be sufficient, if comparing this to an EVE server tick. But package losses are for sure creating big hiccups as buffering is not possible.

I hope so. And I hope that if they do, the pull a ‘Debian’ as I’ve had it ‘up to here’ with bleeding edge software upgrades, many of which should never have been allowed out of the beta stage.

Would be nice to see Microsoft not calling the graphic shots and library requirements for a change too.

Given that the Steam Deck will come by the end of year which will run an Arch Linux based version of Steam OS, gaming on Linux could possibly see a surge. Would also be pretty sad if EVE doesn’t run on it or constantly has avoidable issues like we have today.

I understand that official support may not be in the cards, as that may not be justifiable. But I would have expected them to at least do some smoke tests when rolling out new versions by now and maybe drop some information beforehand if they encounter an issue.

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