The industry window


(CoffeeZombie mortuus) #1

industry%20UI

So I’ve been fiddling with the industry window. So which one is the real full price between the green and red estimates and why is green lower then red sometimes and sometimes higher. Can you manually set the resource prices.


(Jenne Wain) #2

These are both estimates, and are never accurate (usually overstated, if anything). “Red” is the estimated cost of the materials. “Green” is the estimated value of the output. You cannot set of change these values.

There are some third-party tools and resources that you can use to get more accurate values, such as Fuzzworks

https://www.fuzzwork.co.uk/blueprint/

or EVE Market Data

https://eve-marketdata.com

As you noted, sometimes items will show as being unprofitable- that’s just how the market works, so take the values with a grain of salt, but also look for ways to save costs on materials (mine them yourself, set cheap buy orders, etc.)


(CoffeeZombie mortuus) #3

So I just want to be clear the so red is total cost and green is estimated value. is that correct?


(Francis Raven) #4

Red is the value of the materials you are using to build.
Green is the value of the item you are producing once done.

So that being said, you will notice that when the RED value is higher, you will be producing the item at a loss, because the materials (say minerals, PI, etc…) that you are putting in to build the item is worth MORE than the item itself. You will be better off selling the materials (again, say minerals, PI, etc…) rather than producing and selling the end good.

Some things to take into consideration:

  • Your inputs are never free or worthless. If you mine your own ore, reprocess into minerals, and use to minerals to build, make sure that the value of the minerals is not higher than the value of the item you are making. Otherwise, you might as well just sell your minerals. Dont undersell your finished good below the value of your minerals.
  • Those values are ESTIMATIONS based on the regional markets you are in. The materials and end-products might be worth more or less in other regions of space.

(ISD Sakimura) #5

Hi CoffeeZombie,

as @Jenne_Wain has already explained, you should always take estimated prices with a grain of salt, if you really want to get into Industry it will benefit you a lot if you have some form of experience with doing spreadsheets. Basically what spreadsheets do for you in industry is to organize; input materials, costs, output, prices, profits and profit-margins. If you’re just looking to get a more precise estimate you can use evepraisal.com.

Here’s a Youtube video that explains the basics/intermediate behind Spreadsheets and how to make your own (importing Data), however there are some things which has changed since the video was made, such as api.eveonline.com, EVE-central.com API are no-longer working, as an alternative API source you can use the evemarketeer.com which use similar API to eve-central’s API or you can use the eve-marketdata.com API (I’m not sure how this one works). If you want to pull data directly from the EVEonline database you will have to read up on newest ESI and Swagger interfaces (this may be too complicated if you’re just starting out and don’t have any experience in programming).

if you are (want to) using Google sheets, MS Excel or other similar programs, there are a few functions that you might familiarize yourself with, here is a few:

  • VLOOKUP()
  • HLOOKUP()
  • INDEX()
  • MATCH()
  • IMPORTXML()
  • CONCATENATE()

Hope this helps you out

~ISD Sakimura


(system) #6

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