How do Containers work?


(RaveWolf Highborn) #1

Hi all,

I’ve checked the Forum, Archived Forum, and Google, but have not found a solid description or explanation of how the Containers work or the purpose of each type.

What I do (or think I do) know…

  1. Containers are for storing items. (Duh!!)… Okay, the obvious is out of the way.
  2. They store more items than they themselves take up. (from what I’ve seen).
  3. You can have a Max of 1000 items in a Hanger / Cargo Hold. 1 Container = 1 Item even though the container itself may contain 1000 Items, etc.

Types:
Station - Remain at the Station and cannot be moved elsewhere. What is the purpose of it being Password Protected?

Standard - As is. Nothing special.

Secure - Q1: What is the point of a Password? I kinda understand the Anchoring, but what If my ship is destroyed while it’s anchored? Is it just to stop someone sneaking passed and Opening it while my back is turned?

Freight - Self-explanatory, but no Password?

Audit Log? - No idea what its purpose is. Please explain.

For now, I’m just using them to organise my Hanger.

Thanks for your time.
RaveWolf


(Anjyl Took) #2

True in most cases, not true for freight and station.

They can be moved if repacked, but still they are big.

Shared hangers

It anchors to a spot in space, not your ship.

Mostly used as partitions of space in industrials, freighters, etc.

It keeps a log of who went into it. Not, what they took, but if something is missing you know who to ask. (see above shared hangers)

This is the main use of all of them.


(RaveWolf Highborn) #3

How safe is it? I saw another post where some say it can still be taken or destroyed, and then looted.


(Anjyl Took) #4

Any password protected container can have the password bypassed by repackaging it. It repackages the container and everything in it dumps out into the hanger. Things can only be repackaged in a hanger, so if they can get it in their hanger, passwords don’t matter.


(RaveWolf Highborn) #5

So “for all practical purposes”, passwords are useless!?

  1. What purpose do passwords actually serve?
  2. Can a container be un-Anchored by an enemy?

(Trevor Dalech) #6

Passwords are useful if the container is anchored in a spot in space that’s accessible to multiple people. The container will be too large to scoop and move and as long as it has a password, no one can look inside.

For example – if you’re in a corporation which bases out of a POS (wormhole corps mostly… and yeah, this has been replaced by citadels mostly) you don’t want to immediately give corp/ship hangar array access to every new player until you’re sure you can trust them. So they drop a container in the POS to store their stuff, and password it so other people can’t just take from it.


(RaveWolf Highborn) #7

I’m not part of any corp. just yet, still playing solo until I get a grasp of things…
So with the above in mind… If I decided to anchor a password-protected container in space, It will be safe?
… but if it fits in my ship, then how is it “…to large to scoop…”?


(Memphis Baas) #8

Most combat and exploration ships have small cargo spaces, 100 - 500 m3. The Giant Secure Container (GSC) only fits in industrial (transport) ships (or bigger), and then the freight containers only fit in freighter-class ships. So, these containers are “too large to scoop” by the average attack / PVP ships that can destroy your industrial or freighter transport to get at the loot inside. Which is why most gank situations also involve “neutral” alt characters with transport ships of their own, come to pick up the loot. This makes them “suspect” in the eyes of Concord police, allowing players to shoot if they catch them, and thus generally promoting PVP.

Otherwise, to your original questions:

Secure Containers
Anchoring containers in space was important before the recent age of citadels, because all we had before was Player-Owned Starbases (POS’es). These were comprised of a control tower in space and various processing or ship fitting structures, all inside a shield, but NONE allowing ships to actually dock at them. So cargo containers had to be anchored in space, inside the shield, to provide replacement modules and materials to people.

Nowadays, secure containers are still somewhat useful, because of the Mobile Depot deployable; if you’re in wormhole space, or in hostile space where you don’t have access to a station, you could anchor some secure containers with some gear, and use a Mobile Depot to re-fit your ship while in space. You could take the basic combat ship and multiply its cargo space by using Expanded Cargohold modules, then carry some containers and a Depot into hostile space, then anchor and deploy them as a base of operations, and reconfigure your ship for combat, removing the Expanded Cargoholds to fit armor and combat modules.

Audit Log
Corporations in EVE are the equivalent of player guilds in other MMO’s, and they have shared hangar space in all the stations that they own or rent, that members can use. Access to this shared hangar space is somewhat configurable by the CEO / Directors; they can give “no access”, “view”, or “take” access to each member of the corp. Blueprints are an issue, because ideally you want your people to be able to “use” the blueprint for manufacture but not “take” it. So Audit Log containers keep track of who did what, so that the CEO / Directors can review the log and maybe detect possible troublemakers. Keep in mind that it’s an international server, and the CEO may be sleeping while corp members enjoy their prime-time gaming session.

Standard / Freight Containers
Designed to be transported by industrial transport ships and freighters, respectively, there is no password because this game is a PVP game, and if your ship explodes and spills its cargo, that loot belongs to whomever “won” that battle. A password would interfere with claiming the spoils of war.

Secure Containers Again
The password only works if the container is anchored. Otherwise if you’re transporting a secure container with a password, same as above, if you get killed, the attackers have the right to the loot, so they can bypass the password by just scooping the container into their own ship and then re-packaging it at station. Repackaging takes all the items out of the container and puts them on the station hangar floor.

Station Containers
These are for sorting all your junk, or all of a corporation’s junk, in a station; they’re supposed to work like folders for computer files.


(RaveWolf Highborn) #9

This is by far the best explanation and makes perfect sense.

I’m currently using multiple giant containers to organize my stuff at the moment.

Thank you so much for the info and your time…


(Nikea Tiber) #10

As a small aside here, you will learn about eve a lot faster if you join a large, active corporation.

Solo play becomes more entertaining once you are a bittervet.


(RaveWolf Highborn) #11

That is true and well aware…

I’ve been given a few opportunities to join a Corp. but have plenty of stuff to move 15+ Jumps. Various Corp Ads also offer freight services for large amounts of items, but have also been cautioned a few times (Not directly but through observation) to be aware of chancers that will just run away with your hard-earned goods.

The above led me to investigate Containers, etc, and to find the best solution.
With that said, it stands to reason that the sooner I join a corp, the less there will be to transport.
But with so many Corps to choose from, which one is the right one. A battle that will only show it’s true colors over time.

The other issue is unless some Real World miracle happens, I’m not gonna see Omega Status anytime soon (If ever), even though ads offer Alpha Welcome, How long until they demand Omega (“or else”)?


(Boldly Gone) #12

You’ll have no lifetime contract with any corp. If you don’t like them, just quit. But I think you’ll definitely will find some dudes you like to chat with in quite any bigger corp, even if you don’t like the corp.
And now I’m gonna try station containers, had no clue about using them either :slight_smile:


(Forest Archer) #13

Alpha time is permanent although the number of skills trainable is limited to 5 million for alphas but you can still play post that mark just not training skills.


(RaveWolf Highborn) #14

From what I have gathered, Station Containers are exactly that “Station Containers” and cannot be moved elsewhere by any means… The station you buy it at, is the station it stays at.

You can also only Repackage it after 3 weeks of Assembling it or whatever term is used for Containers.


(Anjyl Took) #15

Nope, I’ve bought and transported them. I then used them in a station, and some time later I repackaged one loaded it a ship, flew it back to a trade hub and sold it.


(RaveWolf Highborn) #16

Oh ok, What ship did you use? because the Station Container is 10,000 m³ Packaged.


(mkint) #17

This used to be true. Once upon a time station containers were NPC seeded. The repackaged size was identical to their capacity, and thus there was no ship in the game big enough to move them. They’ve since been patched so the BPs are NPC seeded, but they are player built. They now have a repackaged size that can readily fit in an industrial ship. I’m not sure the repackaging delay still exists, or exists in the same way it used to.

Any industrial ship should be able to get that much capacity or more.


(Anjyl Took) #18

[That’s] What she said.


(RaveWolf Highborn) #19

Yes if you have money to buy Omega to get an Obelisk or Ashar… or the equivalent.


(mkint) #20

Or sell it on the market where it sits, and put up a buy order for one somewhere else. You’re starting to sound whiny. And a freighter is not the same as an industrial. Industrials are roughly equivalent to cruisers in cost and fittings, but are cargo focused. Freighters are a form of capital ship and are pricey.

If you can’t fly an industrial, do what literally every single player who can’t fly an industrial has always done since long before the concept of Alpha clones ever existed: Make a friend. And if you can’t make a friend, make a contract. There are multiple solutions to the issue, there always has been.