What are you reading?


(Ada Allas-Rui) #101

The Illiad.

So far…
The Greek Gods are a bunch of dicks
Agamemnon is a dick
Achilles is a spoiled brat sulking in a snit
Lots of dudes stabbing each other
Hector seems like a decent guy


(Steve Ronuken) #102

Just finishing off the EARC for Uncompromising Honor.

Then restarting the Safehold series (I’ve not read them in a while, and I have the last 2 to read now)


(Veine Miromme) #103

https://www.amazon.com/The-Power-of-Positive-Thinking/dp/1476762759
The Power of Positive Thinking
Mass Market Paperback – 1965
Dr. Norman Vincent Peale

I read another version, possibly by another author, also a medical doctor, and he mentions going to USSR, only to make the decision to return to the USA because he may not have been able to return if he stayed longer.
This however seems related to the Visa requirements, as for another other countries.

I also could not verify if it was the same book, or if the publishing date was in the early 1980s or late 1970s.
I read the book in the early 1980s, around 1983 and 1984.


(Khergit Deserters) #104

VM, if you like that one, you might also like anything by the wise and mighty Emmet Fox. One example is Life is Consciousness. He was a radio broadcaster/speaker in the U.S. in the 1930s.


(LordOdysseus) #105

You are not talking to yourself in this thread. Every book is probably read by someone else, and when it is,they press like. :wink:

I finished reading Barbara Sher’s Wishcraft. It is a book about how to systematically make your dreams come true.


(Khergit Deserters) #106

Yeah, but that ultra-violence. Homer could put Tarantino or Peckinpah to shame. “The spear passed through his neck, he blew a spray of blood, and fell down and bit the dust.” “The spearhead passed through his head, and when Sarpedon withdrew it, an eyeball remained on its tip. He pitched forward and bit the dust, and his armor clattered about him.” :open_mouth:

Still reading Zelazny’s Amber Chronicles, in book 3 Sign of the Unicorn now. Somehow they seem better now than when I read them in high school. (BTW, the Game of Thrones author cites these books as a main inspiration. I couldn’t manage to get past the first chapter of that series, though).


(Jeremiah Saken) #107

that’s what I never read, is it similar to The Book of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe? It is described as mix of fantasy with sf-fi.


(Whitehound) #108

I’m stuck on The Ascendant Stars, by Michael Cobley. It’s the third book and I’m half way through, but put it aside and it’s already picking up dust … :sadparrot:


(Khergit Deserters) #109

Here’s a little no-spoilers synopsis of the premise. Amber is a beautiful medieval city on the side of a mountain. It is the only true world. Any other world, including the Earth, is just a reflection of some aspect of Amber. In Amber, the worlds are called “Shadow.” Any world that can be imagined exists, somewhere in Shadow. The princes and princesses of Amber can physically walk through Shadow worlds, simply by gradually adding and subtracting elements of landscapes, structures, weather, etc. to morph the current environment around them. For example, they can gradually walk from medieval Amber to 1970s New York (a minor setting in the books), by walk through Shadows along the way.

These demigod-like princes and princess siblings mostly hate, or at best distrust each other. And their father the King of and possible founder(?) of Amber has disappeared. So there’s a power vacuum, and you know what comes next…


(LordOdysseus) #110

At the moment I’m making progress through Darryl Anka’s Blueprint For Change.


(Khergit Deserters) #111

Just finished all 10 books of Roger Zelazny’s Chronicles of Amber. Pretty remarkable, especially the fifth book, The Courts of Chaos. I may have to read it again someday, to figure some things out. It’s a complicated plot, and Roger’s not 100% great at clearly explaining things.

Starting B.H. Liddel Hart’s Strategy.


(Ian Morbius) #112

Ninety Percent of Everything: Inside Shipping…, by Rose George.


(LordOdysseus) #113

I finished reading Darryl Anka’s book several days ago. The last several pages which the author talked about E.T. societies bored me a bit.

Now I’m reading R.J. Palacio’s “Wonder”. I’m 26% through the book. There is also a motion picture of the book it seems.


(Veine Miromme) #114

(Veine Miromme) #115

https://www.amazon.ca/Thats-What-Said-Mark-Chimsky/dp/1416206655/ref=sr_1_12/132-6195387-8795059?ie=UTF8&qid=1529522248&sr=8-12&keywords=that's+what+she+said+book

“The best way to behave is to misbehave.” - Mae West


(LordOdysseus) #116

I’m still reading Wonder and all I can say is people, no matter their age can really be b*ttholes. Poor August Pullman.


(Ian Morbius) #117

delete


(LordOdysseus) #118

I finished reading Wonder and I wonder what to read next(pun intended)?


(LordOdysseus) #119
  • Fiction
  • Non-Fiction

0 voters

What type of book should I read next?


(Khergit Deserters) #120

Hiroaki Saito (translator), The Sword and the Mind
“By plotting stratagems within the ship hangar, he ensured victory a thousand AU away.”_
What this means is that by plotting various stratagems beforehand, you can defeat an enemy a thousand AU away before you ever meet him in space. If you are willing to apply this observation to PVP, regard your mind as the ship hangar. If you keep your mind alert, watch your opponent’s moves and actions, and variously try double-dealing on him to see how he reacts, you may regard this as “plotting stratagems within the ship hangar…”

Winning or losing using the ship depends on the mind. It is the mind that moves the weapons, mods, rigs, and even the capacity and the hull, and make them do what they were made to do.
-Yagyu family collected treatises on swordmanship (paraphrased. of course)